The Year is Complete!

Please feel free to look back through the 365 days of 2010 sunrises, but "a year of getting up to meet the day" is officially completed. There will be no more new posts.

PLEASE JOIN ME FOR MORE SUNRISE POSTS AT THE SUNRISE BLOGGER, WHERE YOU WILL FIND SUNRISE PHOTOS AND REFLECTIONS FROM ME AND FROM CONTRIBUTORS AROUND THE GLOBE.


Thank you so much for visiting.
A one year blog project in which I share a process of transitions: emptying of the nest, reacquainting with my rusty intellect, plowing onward with my first full length book, entering the second half of my first century, and generally reflecting on life.

(see Dec. 29th, 2009 entry for further explanation)

Thursday, January 14, 2010

survival skills

sunrise:  7:10      minus 2 degrees (!)

 In the most recent issue of Bangor Metro magazine there was a nice article by Brad Eden.  It's all about various examples of how wildlife in Maine adapts for the rugged winter weather.  It got me wondering, not for the first time, where all the wildlife in my back yard is these days.  I know some are hibernating, some are spending the winter in their vacation homes down south.  But I usually see more signs of life - small rodent trails, deer tracks.  It could be that they rotate their wintering grounds.  Last year there were areas underneath old apple trees gone wild that looked like Grand Central Station -- they were so trampled down by feasting fauna.

I'm afraid my three canine companions might be the culprits.  Their barking and sniffing around might be too much of deterrent.  I'm sure the critters are around, biding their time until nicer weather, or until the dogs are inside.

In the absence of prey, the dogs have resorted to foraging.  It is pretty amazing to see them stop suddenly before a pristine patch of snow, take a few exploratory sniffs, and start digging with enthusiasm.  Here's Clara going for crabapples:
I did hear an alarmed CHIRP! come from an apple patch yesterday, and I was afraid Clara had captured a chipmunk or vole.  But no, she was only after old apples.  I expect Mr. Vole was only angry at the competition.  Here's Guster with an old, rotten, frozen apple prize:

I have never thought of dogs as fruit eaters, but clearly not all of their wilderness survival instincts have disappeared.  They are programmed to find whatever food may be available.  Well, some of them are.  Kate is oblivious to both apples and frozen whiskers.  She is interested in one thing only:

It is humbling (the instinct to forage, not the obsession with sticks).  I may be getting more familiar with sunrise and natural light, but I think it will be a long time before I can smell apples through the snow.

1 comment:

  1. I love the last picture. Spectacular dogography.

    ReplyDelete